Services

The Carbon-Scuylkill Endoscopy Center is dedicated to providing the best quality of care to our patients in the most caring and cost-effective manner. We want to help you maintain a healthy lifestyle through the detection and treatment of the following gastrointestinal issues:

  • Upper Endoscopy (EGD)
    • Diagnosis and Management of Celiac Disease
    • Diagnosis and Management of Peptic Ulcer Disease
    • Detection and Treatment of Barrett's Esophagus
    • Heartburn, Hiatal Hernia and Reflux (GERD) Evaluation
    • Evaluation of Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Anemia
  • Colonoscopy
    • Diagnosis and Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Evaluation of Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Anemia
    • Colon Cancer Screening
    • Polyp Removal Hemorrhoid Treatment

Our professional staff will make sure that you feel as comfortable as possible, answering any questions you may have about our screenings and treatments. Please call 610-377-9680 to schedule your appointment, or browse our website for more information regarding our services. If you have any other questions or comments, please contact us.

Click on the services below to expand and explore in more detail.
Upper Endoscopy (EGD)
Endoscopy, upper endoscopy, or esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) all refer to the same procedure in which a physician uses an endoscope to examine the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. The endoscope is a small, thin, flexible tube that houses a light and a video camera. After the patient is sedated, the endoscope is gently inserted into the mouth and down the esophagus into stomach or further into the duodenum or small intestine. The endoscope is used to diagnose the cause of the following problems:
  • abdominal pain
  • anemia
  • bleeding in the upper GI tract
  • nausea and vomiting
  • problems swallowing
  • unexplained weight loss
  • an abnormality found on X-rays, CT-scan, or MRI.
Tools may be passed through the endoscope to remove polyps, perform a biopsy, or stop bleeding through electrical cauderization. The procedure may take 5 to 10 minutes but may take as long as 60 minutes depending on any biopsies that are done.

Please see Your Appointment to understand how a procedure is typically administered from start to finish.

Colonoscopy
A colonoscopy is a procedure to examine the inside of the colon, large intestine, or large bowel. The colonoscope is a four foot long, thin, flexible tube that houses a light and a video camera. After the patient is sedated, the colonoscope is inserted into the anus and advanced gently into the rectum and through the colon. The colonoscope is used to diagnose the following:
  • blood in the stool
  • abdominal pain
  • diarrhea
  • a change in bowel habit
  • an abnormality found on colonic X-rays or a CT-scan
Individuals who have a family history of polyps or colon cancer may be recommended to have routine colonoscopies every 3 years as a matter of prevention and detection. With no family history as mentioned, an individual should undergo a colonoscopy every 10 years after age 50. Tools may be passed through the endoscope remove polyps, perform a biopsy, or stop bleeding through electrical cauderization or medical application. After sedation, the average time for an endoscopy is between 20 to 30 minutes but may take as long as 60 minutes depending on whether biopsies are done.

Please see Your Appointment to understand how a procedure is typically administered from start to finish.

Polypectomy
The removal of a polyp is called a Polypectomy. A polyp is a small clump of cells which can be flat or have a stalk. Most polyps are harmless and do not cause symptoms. Although some polyps may exhibit the following:
  • produce bleeding
  • mucous discharge
  • alteration in bowel function
  • abdominal pain (in rare cases)
Over time, polyps can develop into cancer. This is why regular examination of the rectum and colon are necessary for people over 50, those overweight, those who smoke, or for those with a family history of colon cancer.

There is no way of predicting whether or not a polyp will become malignant (cancerous). Therefore, total removal of the polyp is advised. Most polyps can be removed with a colonoscope by snaring them and cauderizing them with a small electrical current. Large polyps may require more than one treatment and those that cannot be removed due to their size and position may require surgery. After a polyp is removed, its recurrence is unusual. But remember that the same factors which caused the polyp to form are still present. New polyps may occur in at least 30% of the people who have previously had polyps. After removal, the physician retrieves the polyp tissue so that it can be analysed under the microscope in the pathology lab.

Biopsy for testing for H. Pylori
Helicobacter pylori is a spiral-shaped bacterium found in the stomach. Due to its shape, this bacterium penetrates the mucousal lining of the stomach afterwhich it weakens the stomach lining making it more susceptible to damage from gastric acids. In fact, an H. pylori infection is the cause for a large percentage of gastric ulcers instead of what was once commonly believed to be stress, spicy foods, or Type A personality. While possible, such an infection doesn't mean you will develop ulcers or even stomach cancer. However, an infection may cause the following symptoms:
  • bloating
  • burping
  • nausea
  • unexplained weight loss
  • black, tarry stools
  • unexplained loss of appetite
  • vomitting which is bloody or appears as coffee grounds
While there are several means of diagnosing an H. pylori infection, the Carbon-Schulkill Endoscopy Center employs endoscopy to biopsy tissue from the upper digestive tract. Upon confirmation of an infection, there are couple of treatment options:
  • antibiotics
  • medications to reduce stomach acid
  • surgery to treat ulcers
The appropriate treatment depends on a number of facts:
  • age, health, and/or medical history
  • severity of infection
  • ability to tolerate medications
Biopsy for testing for Celiac disease
Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder where the consumption of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine. The body mounts an immune response to gluten (a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley) and attacks the villi which are responsible for nutrient absorption. Celiac disease can start any relatively any age afterwhich a person consumes food or medicine containing gluten. Left untreated or undiagnosised, Celiac disease can lead to:
  • Iron deficiency anemia
  • Early onset osteoporosis or osteopenia
  • Infertility and miscarriage
  • Lactose intolerance
  • Vitamin and mineral deficiencies
  • Central and peripheral nervous system disorders
  • Pancreatic insufficiency
  • Intestinal lymphomas and other GI cancers (malignancies)
  • Gall bladder malfunction
  • eurological manifestations, including ataxia, epileptic seizures, dementia, migraine, neuropathy, myopathy and multifocal leucoencephalopathy
There a few tests for screening for Celiac disease. But you must keep in mind that positive antibody or genetic test results only suggest the presence of celiac disease. Presence is not a diagnosis nor is it a guarantee that you will ever develop the disease. Should these results be positive, the next step is to get a biopsy of the small intestine. An endoscopic biopsy by the Carbon-Schuylkill Endoscopy Center will tell you the following:
  • you have celiac disease
  • symptoms improved on gluten-free diet due to placebo effect
  • you have a different disorder or gluten sensitivity that responds to changes in your diet
Biopsy for testing for Ulcerative colitis
Ulcerative colitis is a type of inflammatory bowel disease that causes inflammation and sores in the lining of the large intestine. While it can affect the entire colon, it is usually found in the sigmoid colon and the rectum. The disease can affect people at almost any age but those that have it are usually diagnosed by age thirty. While experts are unsure the causes, they believe it could be bacterial or virual in nature or even an immune response to normal bacteria in the digestive tract. The main symptoms are:
  • rectal bleeding
  • stomach pain or cramps
  • diarrhea (in severe cases, 10 to 20 times a day)
  • in some cases it may cause joint pain, eye problems, or liver issues
While there are multiple means of diagnosing ulcerative colitis, the Carbon-Schulkill Endoscopy Center employs colonoscopy to biopsy tissue from the lower digestive tract. The tissue will be analyzed under the microscope in the pathology lab to confirm the diagnosis.
Biopsy for testing for Crohn's disease
Crohn's disease is a lifelong type of inflammatory bowel disease that causes parts of the digestive system to swell and develop ulcers. While this disease is typically found in the last part of the small intestine and the first part of the large intestine, it can develop anywhere between the mouth and anus. Your risk of developing Crohn's disease is increased in the following circumstances:
  • a close relative was diagnosed with Crohn's disease
  • you are of Eastern European Jewish descent (Ashkenazi)
  • you are a smoker
While experts are unsure the causes, they believe it could be bacterial or virual in nature or even an immune response to normal bacteria in the digestive tract. The main symptoms are:
  • unexplained weight loss
  • stomach pain
  • diarrhea (sometimes with blood, 10 to 20 times a day)
  • less common symptoms are: mouth sores, bowel blockages, anal tears, openings between organs
These symptoms can worsen with infection, hormonal changes, or even smoking. While there are multiple means of diagnosing Crohn's disease, the Carbon-Schulkill Endoscopy Center employs endoscpy or colonoscopy to biopsy tissue from the digestive tract. The tissue will be analyzed under the microscope in the pathology lab to confirm the diagnosis.
Colon Cancer Screening
Colon Cancer Screening is used to look for cancer when a patient doesn't exhibit any symptoms. Colorectal cancer almost always develops from polyps in the colon or rectum. Finding these polyps and removing them before they can become malignant is when treatment works best. Screening for colorectal cancer should begin at age 50 and continue through regular intervals afterward. However, you may need to get screened sooner when the following circumstances apply:
  • a close relative had colorectal polyps or colorectal cancer
  • you were diagnosed with Inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, or ulcerative colitis
  • you were diagnosted with familial adenomatus polyposis or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer
Colorectal cancer is the second leading cancer killer in the United States. Both men and women can get it and the risk increases with age. A regular colonoscopy by the Carbon-Scuylkill Endoscopy Center can help remove polyps before cancer begins and detect cancer early while treatment can work best.

Patient Education

Need even more information?

Visit our Educational Resources page for videos and links regarding gastrointestinal procedures and disorders.